Eligible Lists 

How is the eligible list used?

The eligible list ranks candidates according to their scores. Those with tie scores are given the same rank. The eligible lists are provided to State agencies where the job openings are located. They must follow the rule of three when selecting candidates to interview for a position.

What does it mean to be ranked on a list?

Being ranked on an eligible list refers to your relative standing on the list at the time it was established. Your rank does not indicate immediate eligibility for a given position. Other preferences regarding geographic location, type of position (full or part-time), and type of appointment (permanent or temporary) are also considered.

How long will my name stay on an eligible list?

Most eligible lists are initially established for four years. However, a list can be superseded by a new list after one year. If you decline a canvass by either letter or telephone, or at the interview, your name may be inactivated for the type of appointment, shift, agency or location. See your canvass letter for additional information on declinations. If you decline or are unable to accept a job at a specific time, you may reactivate your name at a later date.

Some examinations are given more frequently, and names of new candidates are interfiled in score order on the eligible list. These lists are referred to as continuous recruitment examinations, and each candidate remains on the list for a period of eligibility that is specified in the examination announcement, typically for 12 months.

What does "status" mean?

How do I inactivate myself on a list?

To be removed from a list, you can request inactivation on ELMS Online.

Canvass Letters 

I’ve received my score, what happens next?

Once you know your examination score, you may begin to receive canvass letters from select state agencies. Agencies send out canvass letters to determine your interest in a specific job and its location, and to request your availability. Canvass letters are not job offers. If you receive a canvass letter, do not leave your current job. If you receive a canvass letter for a job you are interested in, return the canvass letter to the address indicated on the letter by the return date. If you return the canvass letter late, the agency is not required to consider you for that job, even though you will remain on the eligible list. Agencies are not required to send canvass letters or conduct interviews. However, in most cases they do. Once they have conducted interviews, agencies are required to hire from the eligible list according to the rule of three.

If you are undecided about your interest in a particular position that you’ve received a canvass letter for, it is recommended that you respond to the canvass inquiry and indicate that you are interested in being interviewed. After you have found out more about the job, you can always decline an offer if you receive one.

Will I get the job if I get the highest score?

If you are the top scorer you might be considered for the job, but having a high score does not guarantee that you will be hired — see the Rule of Three below. The canvass and interview are equally important parts of the selection process.

Rule of Three 

What is the "rule of three?

All candidates at the highest score are immediately eligible for consideration for appointment. Candidates at lower scores can be considered only when there are fewer than three candidates at higher scores.

Any candidate's eligibility for appointment depends not only on his or her rank (all eligibles who received the same score are equally ranked) but also how many other candidates are tied at that and higher level ranks. The following two examples illustrate how this might work:

Example One
Score
Number of candidates at this score
Rank of candidates
100
1
1
95
1
2
90
1
3
In this case all three candidates at all three scores and ranks are eligible to be appointed.


Example Two
Score
Number of candidates at this score
Rank of all candidates at this score
100
10
1
95
10
11
90
10
21
In this case, only the ten candidates at score 100 and rank 1 are eligible for appointment. If, however, through hiring or declinations the number of candidates at 100 is reduced to 2, then all 10 candidates at the score 95 (rank 11) can also be considered. Only if there were only two or fewer candidates at the scores of 100 and 95 (ranks 1 and 11) can any of the 10 candidates at the 90 score be considered.